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Consumer group complains to FDA about ‘inconsistent’ NuVal nutrition ratings

3 commentsBy Caroline Scott-Thomas , 11-May-2012

The National Consumers League (NCL) has filed a formal complaint with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) about the NuVal on-shelf nutrition rating system – and urged the agency to standardize nutrition rating schemes.

In its complaint , the NCL claims that the NuVal system is proprietary and non-transparent, and leads to inconsistent ratings that prefer processed foods like brownie mixes and potato chips over canned fruits and vegetables. NuVal gives foods a rating from 1 to 100 based on a patent-pending algorithm that weighs generally favorable nutrients against generally unfavorable nutrients; the higher the score, the greater the nutritional value.

Under the scheme, Baked Lays Originals Potato Crisps receive a rating of 25, while Raley’s Diced Pears in Light Syrup are rated as a 10. Ghirardelli Caramel Turtle Chocolate Brownie Mix has a score of 22, but S&W Yellow Cling Peach Chunks in Light Syrup score just 7.

Even Dole Sliced Peaches in 100% fruit juice score lower than the brownie mix and potato chips, with a rating of 20.

The organization says that NuVal is out of step with the Institute of Medicine’s studies on nutrition labeling , and the FDA’s position as stated in a letter to the now-defunct Smart Choices labeling scheme, which said the agency would be concerned if nutrition labels “had the effect of encouraging consumers to choose highly processed foods and refined grains instead of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

The NCL letter says: “The FDA has specifically warned industry against encouraging consumers to choose highly processed foods over vegetables and fruits. Yet, under NuVal, potato crisps score more than twice as high as canned pears in light syrup…FDA should act to correct these problems and prevent consumers from being misled.”

NuVal refuted the NCL’s claims.

In an emailed statement, the scheme’s general manager Mike Nugent said: “We strongly believe that the National Consumers League’s claims and assertions about NuVal are unfounded and misguided, and that our business will be unaffected by these claims.”

And in a Huffington Post commentary , principal inventor of the NuVal algorithm, Dr. David Katz, criticized the organization for going straight to the FDA with its complaint, rather than questioning NuVal first.

As for the specific products picked out for criticism, Katz says that the NCL is “absolutely right that some of the scores are mind-boggling.”

He argues that canned fruit, for example, is often extremely high in sugar – much of it added – and much of the fruit’s fiber is lost in processing.

“Every low NuVal score highlighted by the NCL is correct,” he writes. “The reasons for it are available in the nutrition facts. But the problem is – and I thank the NCL for pointing it out – most shoppers don't get past the cover. If a product SAYS it's fruit, most consumers – and apparently, the NCL, if their motives are honest – simply believe it.”

Regarding the NCL’s complaint about NuVal’s lack of transparency, Katz says that the NCL did not ask to review the algorithm, which is complex, but has been made available in peer-reviewed journals.

3 comments (Comments are now closed)

Love NuVal

NuVal has been one of the best things to come to Colorado thanks to King Sooper's. I've seen so many great stories about consumers who have lost weight and improved their nutrition thanks to NuVal. Way to go, Dr. Katz!

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Posted by Amber
11 May 2012 | 20h12

Only the tip of the iceberg

I've found additional mind-boggling applications of NuVal. In one store, I found that the scores were actually higher on a gallon of skim milk versus a half-gallon. Both containers were from same dairy and bore identical Nutrition Facts information.

The snack aisle, in particular, has many additional examples of confusing scores. The "proprietary algorithm" appears to weigh very heavily on certain micronutrients leading to confusing scores in light of macronutrient composition.

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Posted by Scott Hegenbart
11 May 2012 | 19h09

NuVal is worthless

They can't fool all of the people all of the time. Many of us actually read the other parts of the labels. Such as, ingredients and nutrition panals. Those parts are not as misleading as the NuVal ones. Gimmicks may be a novelty for awhile, but people do catch on sooner or later, and see through the farce. We are not as stupid as industry and the government agencies think we are.

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Posted by DJ
11 May 2012 | 18h22

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