SUBSCRIBE

Breaking News on Food & Beverage Development - North AmericaEU edition | Asian edition

News > Markets

Green juice is scary looking, say 28% of Americans

By Maggie Hennessy , 17-Feb-2014
Last updated on 17-Feb-2014 at 15:06 GMT

Despite their trepidation over the look of green juice, many consumers find fruit and vegetable juices to be a more appealing way to incorporate fresh produce into their diets.
Despite their trepidation over the look of green juice, many consumers find fruit and vegetable juices to be a more appealing way to incorporate fresh produce into their diets.

Despite the recent surge in popularity of green juice and consumers’ general belief that it’s the most nutritious juice, many consumers are still skeptical that it actually tastes good, as a recent survey by Jamba Juice found. 

The survey of 2,200 US adults conducted by YouGov revealed that 28% "fear the look" of green juice, even though 32% think it is the healthiest juice option available. Not only that, but nearly a third (32%) say green juice is the one they like least, compared to just 9% who say they like it the best.

Despite their trepidation over the look of green juice, many consumers find fruit and vegetable juices to be a more appealing way to incorporate fruits and vegetables into their diets.

Although 89% of US adults believe that whole fruits and vegetables are better than juice, 68% say drinking juice is more convenient. Indeed, more than one in five say they would prefer to drink beets (21%) and dark leafy green vegetables like spinach (23%) and kale (20%) in juice, rather than eating them whole.

Millennials more open to green juice, drinking their veggies

The results of the YouGov study also highlighted a discrepancy between how Baby Boomers and Millennials view juice. Not only were Millennials more open to green juice, but also to the broader notion of drinking vegetables. 

Among the findings:

  • Millennials are twice as likely as Boomers to think that vegetables taste better in juice (39% vs 18%);
  • Millennials are twice as likely as Boomers to prefer green juice (13% vs 6%); and,
  • Millennials are twice as likely as Boomers to most often drink green juice (13% vs 6%).

Combined, two-thirds (66%) of Americans believe fresh-squeezed juice is healthy. But it’s not enough, as 2013 USDA data points out that Americans are only consuming 1/3 of the fruit and 2/3 of the vegetables they need each day, based on MyPlate serving suggestions. 

Subscribe to our FREE newsletter

Get FREE access to authoritative breaking news, videos, podcasts, webinars and white papers. SUBSCRIBE