SUBSCRIBE

Breaking News on Food & Beverage Development - North AmericaEU edition | APAC edition

Sectors > Prepared Foods

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Global cuisine will rise in 2017 along with complex nutrition claims

Post a comment

By Elizabeth Crawford

06-Jan-2017
Last updated on 06-Jan-2017 at 15:25 GMT2017-01-06T15:25:52Z

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Global cuisine, complex nutrition claims in 2017
Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Global cuisine, complex nutrition claims in 2017
Loading the player...

Despite a rising nationalism in the US born out of the contentious presidential election cycle, Americans remain open to global cuisine and as such, in 2017, international flavors and cultures will continue to heavily influence what’s hot and what’s not in the US food and beverage, predicts a globe-trotting nutrition communication expert.

“Every year our cooking gets more and more global and it is very exciting to see, even as our politics turn here in the US, that we are still open minded from a culinary perspective,” Julie Meyer, the founding partner for the nutrition communication company Eat Well Global, says in this episode of FoodNavigator-USA’s Soup-To-Nuts Podcast.

“We are not only globally focused, but very adventuresome and we are always looking for the next thing, the newest, the hottest, the thing nobody has tried before,” she adds.

So what will those things be in 2017? Meyer predicts Americans will see more key ingredients from Asia, such as jackfruit, and from Brazil, such as exotic fruits, vegetables and tapioca. Innovative ways to eat fish will come from Nordic countries and Africa will bring “a lot of super interesting grains” to use in new ways in the American diet, Meyer said.

She also predicts fermented foods and beverages, such as sauerkraut, pickles, kombucha and drinking vinegar will continue to gain traction as Americans learn more about their health benefits and continue to seek complex flavors.

In addition, she said, tubers and roots from around the world are starting to take hold in the US diet. Specifically, she noted cassava, yams, taro and sweet potato are all being used in more diverse ways to create complex flavors and new textures.

How long until predictions reach fruition?

Now, some of these predictions have come up before. Take Brazilian food for example. This was a big prediction for 2016 based on the belief that the Olympics would expose Americans to the host country’s more unique dishes and ingredients. And while some Brazilian foods have worked their way into the diets of niche consumer groups, much of this success comes from efforts that began long before the Olympics and 2016. Which begs the question, how long does it really take for a flavor of food to go from being an optimistic prediction to being a realistic option in restaurants and retail stores.

Meyer admitted that many New Year’s predictions actually take a couple of years to fully develop due to consumer education, supply chain and product development – all of which can take a while.

The current political climate also could influence adoption rates, Meyer says, but she remains confident that Americans are open to new cuisines from around the world, even if they are focusing inward politically.

“I think the American food scene will be divided. … I live in Brooklyn and everyone I know eats injera [Ethiopian bread made from teff]. They know what it is when I mention it, they are perfectly comfortable with the wide variety of global foods. They want to know where it came from, they want to know who made it, they want it to be health, non-GMO – they want all of that,” she said. “And I believe another large portion of our country doesn’t really care. They don’t care where it is from. They are potentially not as health conscious, they sort of want their food how they want it, where they want it and in as much quantity as they want it and they feel really comfortable with that.”

This means that large food manufacturers will be making food for two very diverse audiences and will need to tailor their offering and marketing as a result, she added.

Health issues will balance flavor exploration

As exciting as exploring new flavors and dishes from around the world is, Meyer notes manufacturers also will need to continue to promote healthy eating through reformulation and advertising – a task which has never been easy and could become more difficult or less pressing as new leadership in the country shifts the nation’s attention away from nutrition and exercise and towards other priorities.

Despite this turmoil, she predicts America’s battle with sugar and sodium will remain top issues in 2017. She also predicts high fiber and high protein will continue to be important to consumers.

However, she cautions that the days of random fortification are over and that adding fiber, protein and other vitamins and minerals to products needs to make sense. For example, she noted consumers look for protein in bars, but placing it in clear beverages might be a turn off to consumers in part because it is so unexpected.

Using health claims to market new products

Beyond that though, Meyer says incorporating health claims into marketing can be a significant positive for companies – provided they do so responsibly.

“I would say one of the challenges … around incorporating nutrition into the marketing message is that consumers want an excuse to have your products. They want to hear good news about your product. They want to know that it is healthier, that they are making a healthier choice to feel good about themselves and pat themselves on the back,” but they also are doing research and won’t be fooled by misleading health claims, such as a brownie is good for their hearts, she said.

Thus a major marketing challenge that will develop in 2017 is ensuring the stories behind products are told in authentic, accurate way with the right spokesperson and to the right audience, she said. 

Post a comment

Comment title *
Your comment *
Your name *
Your email *

We will not publish your email on the site

I agree to Terms and Conditions

These comments have not been moderated. You are encouraged to participate with comments that are relevant to our news stories. You should not post comments that are abusive, threatening, defamatory, misleading or invasive of privacy. For the full terms and conditions for commenting see clause 7 of our Terms and Conditions ‘Participating in Online Communities’. These terms may be updated from time to time, so please read them before posting a comment. Any comment that violates these terms may be removed in its entirety as we do not edit comments. If you wish to complain about a comment please use the "REPORT ABUSE" button or contact the editors.

Related products

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Using food influencers to market products

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: How to select and best use food influencers to market products

While Americans are becoming more adventurous in what they eat, they often still need...

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Global cuisine, complex nutrition claims in 2017

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Global cuisine will rise in 2017 along with complex nutrition claims

Despite a rising nationalism in the US born out of the contentious presidential election...

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: The rise of vegan cheese alternatives

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: The cultivation and rise of vegan cheese alternatives

There is no denying that vegan is on the rise with consumers looking for...

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast Defining, meeting consumer demand for clean label

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Defining and meeting consumer demand for clean label

The predictable upcoming onslaught of annual New Year’s resolutions to “eat better” could lead to surge...

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Expanding cranberries’ appeal beyond the holidays & to a new generation

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Expanding cranberries’ appeal beyond the holidays & to a new generation

For most Americans cranberry sauce is a Thanksgiving staple, but it isn’t the dish...

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast Evolving soy’s marketing strategy beyond protein

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Evolving soy’s marketing strategy beyond protein

Soy may be best known in America as a source of high-quality protein, but...

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Is low-FODMAP the new gluten-free?

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Is low-FODMAP the new gluten-free?

For the 45 million Americans who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome, identifying food that...

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: Ugly produce can help cut costs & generate sales

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: How ugly produce can help companies cut costs & generate sales

Most Americans are trained from a very young age to believe that beautiful is...

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: How to better reach Hispanic shoppers

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: How to better reach Hispanic shoppers

With a collective spending power of $1.5 trillion, the Hispanic and Latino population in...

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast The rise and evolution of meat snacks in America

Soup-To-Nuts Podcast: The rise and evolution of meat snacks in America

In the past few years, Americans’ growing demand for protein and desire for on-the-go...

More must be done to make the healthy choice the easy choice CSPI says

Companies, retailers must do more to make the healthy choice the easy choice, CSPI says

Consumer interest in healthy eating is at an all-time high, and in many ways...

FOOD VISION USA 2016 TRAILBLAZERS: Shaka Tea

FOOD VISION USA 2016... THE TRAILBLAZERS: Shaka Tea puts māmaki on the map, 'We're building an authentically Hawaiian brand'

Launching a new brand in the ready-to-drink tea market is not for the faint-hearted,...

FOOD VISION USA 2016 TRAILBLAZERs: Afineur cultured coffee

FOOD VISION USA 2016... THE TRAILBLAZERS: Afineur taps into fermented trend with ultra-smooth cultured coffee

Afineur – one of three winners in this year's trailblazers challenge at Food Vision USA –...

VoxPop: How small brands can keep image after big company acquisition

VoxPop: Do consumers still ‘trust’ smaller brands after they've been acquired by larger companies?

Large companies are buying up smaller brands here and there, yet the size of...

VoxPop: Is a plant-based diet the future?

VoxPop: Is a plant-based diet the future? We ask people in the industry

At November’s FoodVision USA, we snatched several attendees to get their take on the...

Plant-based burger just another protein option, says Beyond Meat

Plant-based burger just another protein option, says Beyond Meat: ‘All of a sudden, the meat aisle becomes the protein aisle’

The Beyond Burger – the first refrigerated plant-based patty to sit in the meat...

6 steps to take to “do good” and expand appeal to modern consumers

6 steps companies can take to “do good” and expand their appeal to modern consumers

Modern Americans expect much more from food companies today than they did in the...

FOOD VISION USA Innovate or die, says Rabobank

FOOD VISION USA: Dude, where's my consumer?

Many ‘legacy’ food and beverage brands are losing market share because they have “lost...

Sally robot salad maker offers mass customization, reThink Food

Rise of the machines: Meet the new wave of robots heading to your kitchen and your favorite restaurant

From robotic hands on rails above your worktop that will make your dinner, and...

Key Industry Events

 

Access all events listing

Our events, Shows & Conferences...

Promotional Features

Content Provided by Fonterra

Way forward with whey protein