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Anti-gluten antibodies are a red herring

John—There are a lot of myths about gluten IgA antibodies. I think of them more as a protective coating for the intestine—a response that occurs on exposure to many foods. This consistent with the observation that celiacs who have gone on a gluten-free diet (and hence lack anti-gluten IgA) are actually more sensitive to traces of gluten than they were before. I do not follow your logic that the mere presence of an antibody automatically demonstrates an adverse reaction.

While I have not read the book that you mention, I appreciate that books can be a source of interesting hypotheses. However, I can find very little peer-reviewed evidence that the presence of anti-gluten IgA antibodies (which are present in a substantial fraction of the whole population!) is responsible for any ill-effects. I would appreciate hearing of any literature that you are aware of.

Posted by Peter Olins, PhD
24 October 2012 | 22h10

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