Sugar reduction

Added sugar from soda, energy and sports drinks accounts for a fairly modest 4.9% of total energy in the American diet

Added sugars account for 14.1% of total energy intakes for Americans

What are the biggest contributors of added sugars to the US diet?

By Elaine Watson

While we tend to assume that fast food outlets (the bottomless soda cup) contribute a disproportionate amount of added sugar to the US diet compared with store-bought groceries, new data shows that the reverse is actually true.

Naturex' Brad Meyers: “Not a single state in the country has obesity prevalence of less than one in five. Why? A lot of theories are pointing to sugar consumption in soft drinks. Whether or not it’s fair to blame the sugar industry, that’s the world we are operating in.”

Insights from IFT Wellness 2014

How should the industry tackle sugar reduction?

By Maggie Hennessy

Attending a series of sessions on sugar reduction during the Institute of Food Technologists’ (IFT) 2014 Wellness conference, a few common themes kept resurfacing: that obesity remains a big problem, and that—like it or not—the sugar industry is assuming...

A standard can of sugar-sweetened soft drink would exceed the 5% limit on added sugars for most people

WHO recommends halving sugar intake advice

By Caroline SCOTT-THOMAS

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has advised halving sugar intake advice from 10% of total calories to 5% of total calories in a new dietary guideline proposal.

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