GRAS status for milk protein

- Last updated on GMT

A few months after the US Department of Agriculture gave the all
clear for processors to use activated lactoferrin, a milk protein,
to fight disease-causing bacteria arrives the endorsement from the
US Food and Drug Administration.

A few months after the US Department of Agriculture gave the all clear for processors to use activated lactoferrin, a milk protein, to fight disease-causing bacteria arrives the endorsement from the US Food and Drug Administration.

aLF Ventures, a partnership between ingredients company DMV International and Farmland National Beef Packing, filed a petition with the FDA asking the agency to affirm lactoferrin is safe for consumers. The company also submitted scientific data showing that use of lactoferrin is safe for individuals who are allergic to milk, the agency said in a statement.

This week's endorsement, although not required by the company in order to market its lactoferrin, provides the product with 'generally recognized as safe' (GRAS) status.

"Innovative technology is a critical building block in preserving the strong foundation of the US food supply,"​ said Lester Crawford, deputy FDA commissioner. "We must continue to encourage scientific research and new technology to maintain this nation's safe food supply."

The amount of added lactoferrin that remains on the beef after spraying is comparable to the amount of lactoferrin that naturally occurrs in the beef, aLF Ventures said.

Farmland National Beef, a leading US beef packer, is owned by members of US Premium Beef, a producer-owned beef co-op and Farmland Industries. DMV International, one of the largest producers of lactoferrin worldwide, is part of Dutch-based Campina, with annual sales of €3.9 billion.

Related topics: Regulation

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