Multibillion-dollar food manufacturer seeks solution to egg white protein problem

By Elaine WATSON

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Amino acid, Protein, Egg white

Proteins are sensitive to heat, and, even if left at room temperatures, they will often denature and aggregate...
Proteins are sensitive to heat, and, even if left at room temperatures, they will often denature and aggregate...
A leading food manufacturer is looking for potential partners to pitch technologies that will help inhibit the aggregation and clouding of proteins when egg white is heated.

In a posting​ on the website NineSights, open innovation expert NineSigma says it is “representing a multi-billion dollar food product manufacturer”​ looking for a solution to a technical problem.

It adds: “The client wishes to apply technologies for preventing aggregation of proteins to its own egg products, in order to implement products with added value while retaining the original foamability of the eggs, even after sterilization by heating.

“Therefore, the client has made a request to various fields including the non-food sector.”

Success with other proteins a good starting point

Proteins are sensitive to heat, and, even if left at room temperatures, they will often denature and aggregate, it adds.

Ideally, its client is looking for no cloudiness when a 0.1% by weight egg white protein solution is heated at 65 -100°C for at least ten minutes, explains NineSigma.

“Because protein formulations have recently been used to treat intractable diseases, the technology to concentrate proteins without aggregation is of great interest. This has led to extensive research throughout the world into technologies to inhibit the aggregation of proteins.”

The client “welcomes proposals even if they do not satisfy the above requirements, as long as there are actual results with other proteins and there is the possibility of satisfying the requirements in the future”, ​it adds.

Possible approaches to the challenge

Anticipated solutions to the challenge might include adding amino acid derivatives, salts, surfactants, polymers, proteins or polysaccharides; physic-chemical treatments such as gas exposure, filtering, fractionation or adjustment of salt concentration; or biochemical treatments such as enzyme treatments.

Click here​ for more details.

Related topics: R&D, Proteins

Related news

Related products

show more

Quinoa syrup, a refreshing option to rice syrup

Quinoa syrup, a refreshing option to rice syrup

Faravelli Inc, food ingredients distributor - North America | 24-Mar-2021 | Product Catalog

Quinoa syrup by Naturis is a 100% natural alternative to rice syrup, ideal for balanced vegan diets.

low in fructose
with lysine...

The Heart of Plant-Based Meats

The Heart of Plant-Based Meats

Applied Food Sciences | 24-Feb-2021 | Technical / White Paper

No disrespect to the original veggie burgers, but consumers may never settle for dry, spongy patties again... not after trying an Impossible Burger. The...

Plant-based innovation with oats

Plant-based innovation with oats

Lantmännen Functional Foods | 09-Dec-2020 | Technical / White Paper

Plant-based foods, meat analogues, dairy alternatives and protein-enriched foods and beverages have never been more popular. In this white paper, we look...

Related suppliers

Follow us

Products

View more

Webinars