Mexico to invest in poultry infrastructure

By Carina Perkins contact

- Last updated on GMT

Mexico to invest in poultry industry modernisation
Mexico to invest in poultry industry modernisation

Related tags: Mexico, Livestock, Poultry

Mexico’s poultry sector will invest more than MXN3m (US$232,913) next year in a bid to modernise the country’s production and processing infrastructure.

Speaking at the country’s National Poultry Congress 2013, held in Baja California Sur, the head of the National Poultry Union (UNA) Jorge García de la Cadena Romero said the investment would provide modern infrastructure for the Mexican poultry industry, improving food safety and adding value to exports.

Romero stressed the importance of poultry production to Mexico, pointing out that the industry employed more than 200,000 people and contributed to 0.7% of the gross domestic product. He added that for every 10kg of animal protein consumed by Mexicans, 6kg were egg and chicken.

Opening the congress, general coordinator of the Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food (SAGARPA), Dr Francisco Gurría Treviño, said that Mexico’s poultry sector was “exemplary”​ in its organisation, which had enabled it to overcome challenges in the past.

He also highlighted the work that SAGARPA was doing with the industry, such as the partnership formed with Mexico’s National Health Service, Food Safety and Food Quality (SENASICA) and the UNA to fight avian influenza in Jalisco last year.

Poultry sector entrepreneur Alberto Cervantes Ramirez was given an award for his services to the industry meeting, which was also attended by Enrique Sanchez Cruz, chief director of SENASICA; Cota Trinidad Acosta, the delegate of SAGARPA in the state; Joel Avila Aguilar, secretary of economic promotion and development of Baja California Sur; and Alfredo Hernandez Villaseca, lieutenant commander of the General Secretariat of the Navy of Mexico (SEMARNAT).

Related topics: Meat

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