Upton’s Naturals develops banana blossom… a novel entry to the plant-based food arena: 'It has a light, delicate, flaky texture like fish'

By Elaine Watson contact

- Last updated on GMT

Banana blossom: 'It has a light, delicate, flaky texture like fish, and works really well breaded and fried as a fish alternative...'
Banana blossom: 'It has a light, delicate, flaky texture like fish, and works really well breaded and fried as a fish alternative...'

Related tags: plant based, plant-based meat, Upton's Naturals

While the Beyond Burger and Impossible Burger have spawned a wave of soy- and pea-protein fueled copy-cats seeking to precisely mimic the taste and texture of beef, there is room in the plant-based foods market for products made from a broader range of ingredients, says the founder of Upton’s Naturals, who has tapped into a novel ingredient – banana blossom – for his latest innovation.

“I can’t believe how many companies looked at Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods and said, 'That looks like it’s been successful, let’s try to do the exact same thing.' We’ve always tried our best to have things that set us apart from what already exists, and keep an extremely clean label,” ​Dan Staackmann told FoodNavigator-USA.

“I became a vegan 28 years or so ago, and it opened my mind and my palate to so many ethnic foods that I would never have considered as a teenager that ate pepperoni pizza and ice cream.

"You don’t have to eat banana blossom or jackfruit ​[instead of meat] every day, but it’s just exciting to discover new foods and introduce new things into your life.”

With listings secured in Whole Foods stores nationwide (although the launch may be a little delayed owing to coronavirus), Upton’s Naturals’ banana blossom is cooked in a retort pouch in a small amount of brine and is a shelf-stable product with a shelf-life of two years (although it should be refrigerated and consumed in days once opened).

The plan is to stock it in the ethnic food set alongside a lightly seasoned shredded jackfruit product also under the Upton’s Naturals brand.

Banana-blossom-GettyImages-lenawurm
Banana blossom is widely used in South Asian and Southeast Asian cuisines (picture: GettyImages-lenawurm)

'Americans are far more fiber-deficient than protein-deficient'

Made from the teardrop-shaped purple flower at the end of banana fruit cluster sometimes called banana heart – an artichoke-like ingredient widely used in South Asian and Southeast Asian cuisines – Upton’s Naturals’ banana blossom is ready-to-heat and works particularly well with breading (as depicted on the packaging), Staackman explained.

“Right now, it’s a waste item that doesn’t ​[routinely] get used for anything. I’ve seen it fresh, minced up in some Thai dishes or sold canned and brined, but it’s not widely available here ​[in the US]. 

"It has a light, delicate, flaky texture like fish, and works really well breaded and fried as a fish alternative. It's a new ingredient ​[to Americans] so we have a recipe on the back of pack that gives people clear instructions on what to do with it, plus we’ll have recipes on our website​ [once it launches].”

Like jackfruit – the star ingredient in other Upton’s Naturals products – banana blossom is packed with fiber and micronutrients, but isn’t a great source of protein, something Staackmann isn’t losing any sleep over.

“One thing people forget is that Americans are far more fiber-deficient than protein deficient.”

jerky-bites-uptons naturals
Although vegan jerky can be made from several plant bases such as soy, coconut or jackfruit, wheat was the obvious choice for Upton’s Naturals, which has worked with the ingredient for 14 years, says founder Dan Staackmann

Coronavirus: 'Things are changing by the minute'

Like many food companies sourcing ingredients or packaging from overseas, Staackmann has faced some recent challenges thanks to coronavirus, which impacted a packaging supplier in Sri Lanka, where the banana blossom is sourced and packaged.

There’s no issue with the banana blossom, but there’s been some issues with the packaging and getting things in and out of the country. Some samples we’d sent in are stuck at customs, for example.”   

The product was supposed to hit Whole Foods in early May, and now it could be summer or early fall, he said.

Meanwhile, the firm’s new wheat protein-based jerky bites​ are expected to hit some US stores this summer although an international retailer that was going to launch them in August has now pushed back the launch until Q4 or 2021, he said.

“Everything is in flux for a lot of people right now. Things are changing by the minute. Some retailers are going forward ​[as planned] and some of them are saying we're not really looking at anything new right now until things get back to normal."

On the plus side, Staackmann has not had any major issues with securing supplies of jackfruit (used in several key products), which he sources from Thailand. "It's on lockdown but food is classed as an essential business and the products are getting through.

"We've seen higher prices on one or two spices that go into our products but we think it's only going to be short term."

cool beans wraps

The quest to precisely mimic the taste and texture of meat and dairy is driving innovation in the next generation of ‘plant-based’ foods. But there is also growing demand for less ‘processed’ products made from whole foods, says the CEO of Cool Beans.

Read more HERE.

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