Nutrition Facts

Professor Kessler: 'To the harried shopper hoping to make some healthy choices, this label would offer a quick way of identifying high-calorie, obesity-inducing food'

Proposals don't consider a product's overall nutritional value, says professor

Former FDA commissioner: Nutrition Facts overhaul doesn’t go far enough

By Elaine Watson

FDA proposals to overhaul the Nutrition Facts panel on food labels are “strong” and “likely to make an important contribution”, says former FDA commissioner David Kessler, M.D. “But I believe they don't go far enough.”

Betty Campbell, EAS Consulting:

Insights from IFT 2014

Is your product ready for nutrition label changes?

By Maggie Hennessy

Food and beverage manufacturers are holding their collective breath in anticipation of the proposed changes to the Nutrition Facts panel put forth by the Food and Drug Administration and likely to be finalized next year. 

The GICR report found that the proposed labels are more helpful to consumers when viewed in a brief, 10-second timeframe, paralleling the amount of time that would be realistically spent glancing at labels while shopping. (Pictured l to r: current, proposed and alternate Nutrition Facts panels)

Proposed nutrition labels more effective than current labels: survey

By Maggie Hennessy

In line with the goals set forth by FDA’s proposed Nutrition Facts updates, consumers find proposed labels easier to read in less time and perceive food and beverage products with larger serving sizes to be less healthy, according to a study from the...

“There were originally two options put forward, the main proposal, which we saw behind Mrs. Obama at the launch, and one with a clear difference between ‘get more’ and ‘get less’ nutrients. That alternate option just keeps getting lost,

How much do consumers use (and understand) nutrition labels?

By Maggie Hennessy

On the heels of the US Food and Drug Administration’s proposed updates to the Nutrition Facts label—which received largely positive marks from the food and beverage industry—new research from the NPD Group is questioning how many US consumers even routinely...

Should booze come with a Nutrition Facts panel?

Should booze come with a Nutrition Facts panel?

By Elaine WATSON

We all know that too much alcohol can make you drunk, but it can also make you fat, say consumer groups who argue that bottles of beer, wine and spirits should come with a Nutrition Facts panel that clearly states how many calories they contain per serving.

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